My first trip to Texas with my Baby Girl

I have flown back to Texas dozens of times now. Year after year, I return from somewhere in the world to THE somewhere that held my little soul for all the years of my childhood. Having lived outside Texas now for nearly half my life, I notice it fresh every time – the rolling brushland, the easy mood, the crisp air, the yellow of winter grass and light blue of the big, wide winter sky. This past flight home was the first time I was introducing this wonderland to my kid. Our Baby Girl is nearing the 3 month mark,…

texas to minnesota

So, it turns out it takes a long time to get from Texas to Minnesota. Long enough that you can make a thirteen minute video. Making the video kind of gave me someone to talk to for 18 hours which makes me sound crazy, but actually the video helped pass the time. And this morning I put some scraps together. Here you go… just in case you want to watch someone talk to himself.

coming back to america: expected and unexpected

There are so many parts of reentry to America to talk about, and I’ve started to make two lists. Here’s what I have so far: Things that are really not surprising at all: Super Wal-Mart is super terrifying. For two years, I did grocery shopping the Armenian way. I chatted with shopkeepers, had coffee with my bakery ladies, and shook hands with the vegetable man. There were so many things I couldn’t find in Armenia like brown sugar, buffalo wings, or tostada shells. Still, after growing up on America’s industrial food system, it was actually thrilling to know I could…

it’s raining

Stop the presses. No, seriously, I was writing another post, stopped and took a Diet Coke to my dad out in the drive way with raindrops falling on and all around me. RAINDROPS. He left, and I just stood in the driveway for ten minutes, befuddled by all this water from thousands of feet away. I want to go out there again. I feel like I’m in the Skylark part of the Sarah, Plain & Tall trilogy. Where are you, Glenn Close, Christopher Walken? Let’s clasp hands and dance in the soggy grass!

texas is too hot

The trees have given up. Really, it’s too hot. They’re over it. It’s seems like our grass here in Central Texas just won’t grow. The trees can’t take the heat. This branch from a cedar elm was shed in desperation, if trees can experience such a thing. Over 40 days with temperatures on or above 100˚F (40˚C). I have long since melted. I arrived home to find that over half of my family’s trees have died from oak wilt, and now branches are falling. That feels sad; it feels like something I want to complain about. Then I see something…